WATCH: Joint Base Charleston firefighters train for plane crash - WCBD-TV: News, Weather, and Sports for Charleston, SC

WATCH: Joint Base Charleston firefighters train for plane crashes

Posted: Updated:

What happens if there is an airplane crash at Charleston International Airport or Joint Base Charleston? It's a scary question but it's a scenario that local Air Force firefighters must ask and train for.

"If you've never really done it before, there's really nothing like it," Ssgt. John Fredrickson said.

News 2 had chance to watch a monthly training exercise at Joint Base Charleston as they prepare for plane emergencies.

"We're looking for spark fires. We're looking for entrance passes to get people out and anything that is on fire we are trying to cool down," SrA Kirt Wallace explained.

"You hop off the truck. You know you are really going to make a difference everyday. Possibly saving somebody's life," Fredrickson said.

The firefighters run several live fire scenarios each month.

"The closer you get, the hotter it's going to be and you can really feel the heat so that's why we wear uniforms to bounce the heat off. But, you can absolutely feel it. It starts getting pretty hot, so you've got to get that water on there and start cooling it down as fast as you can," Fredrickson said.

It's designed to put their skills to the test.

"Possible aircraft emergency on one of the aircrafts here in Charleston and that way when it comes time to actually go out and do the real job we're ready for it," Fredrickson said.

The fires are fueled by propane and they represent not only Air Force C-17's, but also passenger planes at Charleston International Airport.

"We're trying to make sure that our aim is right because people are coming out. We don't want to hit them. So basically we are just trying to perfect our craft," Wallace said.

In a real crash or emergency the flames are more intense and the stakes are much higher.

"Propane doesn't burn as hot as jet fuel. The temperatures of jet fuel would be extremely hotter than what we are experiencing here. This is more of a controlled scenario so out there anything can happen," Fredrickson said.

"Hands-on training is most important because talking about it is not going to do it. You have to get out there and practice. You have to go through it and work out the kinks and everything," Wallace said.

  • Employees allege Hyman's kept tips

    Popular downtown seafood restaurant faces class action lawsuit

    Popular downtown seafood restaurant faces class action lawsuit

    Monday, July 21 2014 11:39 PM EDT2014-07-22 03:39:30 GMT
    A class action lawsuit has been filed against a popular seafood restaurant in downtown Charleston, after employees allege their tips were kept from them unfairly. Former employees of Eli Hyman, and other owners of Hyman’s Seafood, are suing for minimum wages and overtime compensation. They allege the restaurant’s policy violates the Fair Labor Standards act. Under what’s known as the tip credit, server’s can be pa...
    A class action lawsuit has been filed against a popular seafood restaurant in downtown Charleston, after employees allege their tips were kept from them unfairly. Former employees of Eli Hyman, and other owners of Hyman’s Seafood, are suing for minimum wages and overtime compensation. They allege the restaurant’s policy violates the Fair Labor Standards act. Under what’s known as the tip credit, server’s can be pa...
  • Report: Higher seas mean extreme floods in SC, NC

    Report: Higher seas mean extreme floods in SC, NC

    Monday, July 21 2014 8:23 PM EDT2014-07-22 00:23:43 GMT
    Rising sea levels will mean extreme floods along the coast of the Carolinas in coming years with billions of dollars in property in danger according to new reports from a nonprofit group of scientists.Climate Central of Princeton, New Jersey, released an analysis of the danger faced in South Carolina on Monday. A report for North Carolina was released last week with an analysis for Georgia due next week.The report found that in South Carolina, the coast is likely to see extreme floods of more...
    Rising sea levels will mean extreme floods along the coast of the Carolinas in coming years with billions of dollars in property in danger according to new reports from a nonprofit group of scientists.Climate Central of Princeton, New Jersey, released an analysis of the danger faced in South Carolina on Monday. A report for North Carolina was released last week with an analysis for Georgia due next week.The report found that in South Carolina, the coast is likely to see extreme floods of more...
  • Rise in mosquito borne illness: EPA will change labeling on repellent

    Rise in mosquito borne illness: EPA will change labeling on repellent

    Monday, July 21 2014 7:10 PM EDT2014-07-21 23:10:25 GMT
    MUSC doctors have a warning for you tonight they are trying to prevent the spread of any mosquito borne illness. This after DHEC is reporting that there has been three cases of a mosquito borne illness called, Chikungunya virus in the state of South Carolina. So far this year, West Nile Virus hasn’t struck South Carolina, but last year, DHEC officials say there were 6 cases of West Nile, 1 Encephalitis cases, 9 cases of Dengue Fever, and 10 cases of Malaria, many of those cases imported f...
    MUSC doctors have a warning for you tonight they are trying to prevent the spread of any mosquito borne illness. This after DHEC is reporting that there has been three cases of a mosquito borne illness called, Chikungunya virus in the state of South Carolina. So far this year, West Nile Virus hasn’t struck South Carolina, but last year, DHEC officials say there were 6 cases of West Nile, 1 Encephalitis cases, 9 cases of Dengue Fever, and 10 cases of Malaria, many of those cases imported f...
Powered by WorldNow

210 W. Coleman Blvd.
Mt. Pleasant, SC 29464

Telephone: 843.216.4875
Fax: 843.881.3410
Email: news@wcbd.com

Can't find something?
Powered by WorldNow
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Media General Communications Holdings, LLC. A Media General Company.