Air Force Reservists return home after 6 month long deployment - WCBD-TV: News, Weather, and Sports for Charleston, SC

Air Force Reservists return home after 6 month long deployment

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As the plane full of loved ones pulled up to the gate at the Joint Base Charleston, the faces of those waiting shone in anticipation. When the doors opened and the first of dozens in camo stepped out of the hold, the crowd erupted.

One hundred Air Force Reservists returning home after six long months overseas, stationed in Southwest Asia, the Middle East and Afghanistan. The men and women were working on several different heavy construction projects while overseas.

Chief Gregory Rice says the homecoming is what keeps them going through all those long months, "This is what we have been waiting on, it's fantastic. We really missed them and we are just ready to go and spend some good time with our family. It's good to be home."

Chief Rice greeted by his wife and two children, their sign reading "I'm here to pick up my Daddy, my hero." Lily Claire, his daughter, immediately asking her dad to go swimming.

"We'll definitely be going swimming soon," Rice says laughing.

From proud children, to proud parents. Scott McLauchlin at the Base to greet his returning son. "I am proud of all of them I tell you. It's something else, I wouldn't trade it for the world. He did a great job," referring to his son Tyler.

When asked, Tyler replied he missed the Lowcountry the most. "The life of the Lowcountry. I miss the ocean and the salt water."

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