Red wolf habitat unveiled at Charles Towne Landing - WCBD-TV: News, Weather, and Sports for Charleston, SC

Red wolf habitat unveiled at Charles Towne Landing

Red wolf habitat unveiled at Charles Towne Landing

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The Charles Towne Landing State Historic Site unveiled a new red wolf habitat Tuesday morning in the Animal Forest at Charles Towne Landing. The habit will be home to four female wolves, which were born last year at the Trevor Zoo in Millbrook, New York.

The 9,000 square foot habitat was built by International Public Works for the SC Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism and finally completed a process that began over a year and a half ago.

"It's a great day in South Carolina and in Charles Towne Landing, as we unveil a link to our state's history," Duane Parrish, SC's Director of Parks, Recreation and Tourism said. "When the first European settlers arrived here at Charles Towne Landing in 1670, the Red Wolf was one of the indigenous animals they found at this land they would call Carolina. In 1970 the Animal Forest was developed to exhibit the animals that were here when the settlers arrived and today we bring back the wolf."

The red wolves once roamed throughout the southeast, however fewer than 100 wolves now live freely in the region. Animal Forest Curator Jillian Davis said the wolves have been getting familiar with their compound for about three weeks prior to the unveiling but still get a little nervous around people.

"They are quite nervous, but they are actually getting used to their environment," Davis said. "It is just all new to them."

Now at this point the wolves do not have names, going instead by numbers. However, Davis said they have been working on changing that, as they look to give the wolves names that are reminiscent of the Lowcountry.

"Right now we are trying to come up with something that is South Carolina themed, so we have been thinking about Indian names," Davis said. "The names that we are throwing around right now are Kiawah, Saluda, Shawnee and Shakira."

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