Loggerhead treated at the South Carolina Aquarium released Thurs - WCBD-TV: News, Weather, and Sports for Charleston, SC

Loggerhead treated at the South Carolina Aquarium released Thursday

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A nice crowd gathered to say goodbye to "Pluff" Wednesday afternoon on Folly Beach. A nice crowd gathered to say goodbye to "Pluff" Wednesday afternoon on Folly Beach.
FOLLY BEACH, SC -

A juvenile loggerhead sea turtle treated by the South Carolina Aquarium Sea Turtle Rescue Program, was released Thursday at the Folly Beach County Park.

A nice crowd gathered to say goodbye to "Pluff" Wednesday afternoon on Folly Beach. The release was held in partnership with the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR) and the Charleston County Parks and Recreation Commission (CCPRC).  

More on the sea turtle being released:

Pluff, a 65-pound juvenile loggerhead sea turtle was found stuck in the pluff mud in a marsh on Hilton Head Island in June of this year. Upon admittance to the Sea Turtle Hospital, Pluff was very lethargic, thin and covered in barnacles. Blood tests showed an extremely low blood protein and anemia (a low level of red blood cells). Supportive care including antibiotics, vitamin injections and fluid therapy were immediately started. After just four months of care, Pluff has fully recovered and is ready to be returned to the Atlantic Ocean.

Sea turtle release details:

You can help care for recovering sea turtles in the South Carolina Aquarium Sea Turtle Rescue Program by going to scaquarium.org and making a donation. You can also find out more information about visiting the hospital as part of a behind-the-scenes tour now offered twice daily, seven days a week at scaquarium.org, both schedule and information are available online.

About the South Carolina Aquarium Sea Turtle Rescue Program:

In partnership with the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR), the South Carolina Aquarium Sea Turtle Rescue Program works to rescue, rehabilitate and release sea turtles that strand along the South Carolina coast. Located in the Aquarium, the Sea Turtle Hospital admits 20 to 30 sea turtles each year. Many of these animals are in critical condition and some are too sick to save.

According to SCDNR, over the last 10 years the average number of sea turtle standings on South Carolina beaches each year is 130. Of these, roughly 10% are alive and successfully transported to the Sea Turtle Hospital. To date, the South Carolina Aquarium has successfully rehabilitated and released 131 sea turtles and is currently treating 6 patients. The average cost for each patient's treatment is $36 a day with the average length of stay reaching nine months.

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