Prince Charles' Foundation to explore new opportunities - WCBD-TV: News, Weather, and Sports for Charleston, SC

Prince Charles' Foundation to explore new opportunities with local companies

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The Prince of Wales, Prince's Foundation is considering investing in large development projects in Charleston. The Prince of Wales, Prince's Foundation is considering investing in large development projects in Charleston.
CHARLESTON, SC -

For the first time HRH, The Prince of Wales, Prince's Foundation is considering investing in large development projects in Charleston. Two top- level representatives from the Foundation were planning to visit Charleston from Friday, October 18th before getting called back to London for a personal matter.

They were planning to discuss sustainable and unique building and development opportunities with a local company, Luxury Simplified Group.

Prince Charles created his foundation 25 years ago. This unique organization forms strategic partnerships in order to help design and build attractive and sustainable homes, workplaces and communities which have minimal impact on the local environment and a positive impact on economies around the world.

According to Foundation Director, Dominic Richards, "The Prince's desire to protect and sustain the natural environment is matched only by his interest in the built environment and how it affects the quality of people's lives."

This kind of thinking is exactly in line with Charleston-based company, Luxury Simplified Group. It's a partnership of like-minded services in real estate, restoration, preservation, architecture, building and design located at 95 Broad Street. "We are thrilled that the Prince's Foundation is coming to Charleston to meet with us about various exciting projects we have going on in and around Charleston," says Luxury Simplified owner and fellow Brit, Chris Leigh-Jones. "Cities are as much about the people as about the buildings, you need both in harmony and that's exactly what the Prince's Foundation has been focused on and what we hope to bring to our own work in Charleston."

The Foundation is also keen on using building artisans such as blacksmiths, brick masons, timber framers, plasterers and stone carvers for its Charleston projects, all of whom have graduated from the American College of the Building Arts here in Charleston. College Founder and now Principal of Building Art, LLC, John Paul Huguley is a member of the Luxury Simplified team. "Over the years, I have admired Dominic and the work the Foundation does. It is wonderful to have the opportunity to partner with the Prince's Foundation and to give our Graduates work in real life projects today," says Huguley.

Representatives for Prince Charles' Foundation plan to re-schedule the visit before the end of 2013 to finalize development endeavors.

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