SC Superintendent of Education applauds new computer based GED t - WCBD-TV: News, Weather, and Sports for Charleston, SC

SC Superintendent of Education applauds new computer based GED test

Posted: Updated:
The new GED, computerized test, will be available January 2, 2014, is streamlined into four sections: math, science, social studies, and English. The new GED, computerized test, will be available January 2, 2014, is streamlined into four sections: math, science, social studies, and English.
COLUMBIA, SC -

State Superintendent of Education, Dr. Mick Zais, issued the following statement announcing the benefits of the computer-based high school equivalency test starting January 2, 2014.
 
"In a society driven by information technology, we need to empower those seeking a high school equivalency certificate to help them pass the test today and succeed in their careers tomorrow," said Dr. Zais.  "My wife, Susan, taught adult education. I know what it's like to see someone earn their GED Diploma and have new doors open for career opportunities."
 
General Educational Development (GED) was first offered in 1942 as a way for those who left high school to serve in World War II to earn a high school equivalency certificate when they returned home.  The GED enabled them to enter the workforce or seek higher education.  Today, 95 percent of businesses and institutions of higher education accept a GED as the equivalent of a high school diploma.
 
In South Carolina about 11,000-12,000 people take the test every year.  Last year, nearly 63 percent of test takers were under the age of 24.  Some 55 percent were male and 45 percent were female.  Thirty-eight percent were African American, 56 percent white, and 3.7 percent were Hispanic.  Since Dr. Zais was elected state superintendent three years ago, the GED pass rate has averaged 75 percent, 2-5 percent above the national average.  For three years in a row, South Carolina had the second highest passage rate in the Southeast.  
 
Last year, about 21 percent of test takers had completed the ninth grade, 32 percent had completed the tenth grade, 33 percent finished eleventh grade and 7 percent completed the twelfth grade.  The current GED test is a paper-pencil test with five subtests: math, science, social studies and English, which includes both reading, and writing.  The test has both essay and multiple choice sections.  The cost is $80.
 
The new, computerized test, which will be available January 2, 2014, is streamlined into four sections: math, science, social studies, and English.  A minimum score of 150 points is required to pass each section with an overall score of at least 600.  The new GED will have an additional score indicating the candidate's college and career readiness.  There will be multiple choice and student response sections.  The cost will be $150.
 
The official GED test can only be taken in one of South Carolina's 50 adult education sites, which are currently preparing students for the transition to the new testing format.  Community-and faith-based organizations also provide GED instructional programs, but are not testing sites.  Individuals who are considering taking the GED test are advised to contact the South Carolina Department of Education's Office of Adult Education to verify the authenticity of any GED testing site.  
 
Additionally, the South Carolina Department of Education is working with the South Carolina Department of Employment and Workforce (DEW) to apply $100,000 of funding, approved by the South Carolina Workforce Investment Board, for scholarships to cover the cost of the test.  
 
Under this plan, which lasts through March 31, 2014, fees for the GED are waived for students who meet the program requirements.  
 
GED candidates across the state who score in the top 5 percent nationally receive a special certificate of recognition from Dr. Zais.
 
"Our adult education leaders are working hard preparing students for the new computer-based test," said Dr. Zais.  "I want to thank the Department of Employment and Workforce, the business community, and faith-based leaders for their support.  They are helping our students advance their education and careers.  We're all working to provide educational opportunities for every citizen," concluded Dr. Zais.
 
Learn more by visiting the S.C. Department of Education's GED webpage

  • Governor to meet with leaders in Atlantic Beach Tuesday

    Governor to meet with leaders in Atlantic Beach Tuesday

    Tuesday, July 29 2014 10:18 AM EDT2014-07-29 14:18:06 GMT
    Governor Nikki Haley will be meeting with Atlantic Beach officials Tuesday morning. In May, she met with local leaders and said Bike Fest should end after this year's violence that coincided with the Memorial Day Bike Fest. During the May meeting, she privately met with several Horry County leaders including Myrtle Beach Mayor John Rhodes and Horry County Chairman Mark Lazarus. She was reportedly shown a five minute compilation of Bike Fest and Memorial Day Weekend clips found on YouTube. "I ...
    Governor Nikki Haley will be meeting with Atlantic Beach officials Tuesday morning. In May, she met with local leaders and said Bike Fest should end after this year's violence that coincided with the Memorial Day Bike Fest. During the May meeting, she privately met with several Horry County leaders including Myrtle Beach Mayor John Rhodes and Horry County Chairman Mark Lazarus. She was reportedly shown a five minute compilation of Bike Fest and Memorial Day Weekend clips found on YouTube. "I ...
  • General Motors award-winning & best-selling pick-up truck recalled 9 times

    General Motors award-winning & best-selling pick-up truck recalled 9 times

    Tuesday, July 29 2014 4:06 AM EDT2014-07-29 08:06:45 GMT
    The 2014 Chevrolet Silverado and GMC Sierra have been recalled 6 times in 2014, which is more than any other vehicle sold in the country.Both pick-ups have seen 9 recalls issued since they went on sale last year. Those recalls did not affect all of the vehicles sold. Some were for fewer than 500 trucks for issues like loose floor mats.GM says the award-winning Silverado is still its best-selling vehicle in America and the Sierra is close behind.
    The 2014 Chevrolet Silverado and GMC Sierra have been recalled 6 times in 2014, which is more than any other vehicle sold in the country.Both pick-ups have seen 9 recalls issued since they went on sale last year. Those recalls did not affect all of the vehicles sold. Some were for fewer than 500 trucks for issues like loose floor mats.GM says the award-winning Silverado is still its best-selling vehicle in America and the Sierra is close behind.
  • Nissan recalling addition 226,000 vehicles because of defective airbags

    Nissan recalling addition 226,000 vehicles because of defective airbags

    Tuesday, July 29 2014 3:56 AM EDT2014-07-29 07:56:40 GMT
    Nissan is recalling more than 226,000 additional vehicles over a defective air bag that has affected much of the global auto industry. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration said Saturday that Nissan North America Inc. is recalling certain lines of its Infiniti, Maxima, Pathfinder and Sentra cars for the model years 2002 to 2004. Faulty air bags have already been blamed for the recall of millions of cars around the world in recent years, including those made by BMW, Chrysler, Ford...
    Nissan is recalling more than 226,000 additional vehicles over a defective air bag that has affected much of the global auto industry. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration said Saturday that Nissan North America Inc. is recalling certain lines of its Infiniti, Maxima, Pathfinder and Sentra cars for the model years 2002 to 2004. Faulty air bags have already been blamed for the recall of millions of cars around the world in recent years, including those made by BMW, Chrysler, Ford...
Powered by WorldNow

210 W. Coleman Blvd.
Mt. Pleasant, SC 29464

Telephone: 843.216.4875
Fax: 843.881.3410
Email: news@wcbd.com

Can't find something?
Powered by WorldNow
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Media General Communications Holdings, LLC. A Media General Company.