2 Your Health New technology keeps runners on the move - WCBD-TV: News, Weather, and Sports for Charleston, SC

2 Your Health New technology keeps runners on the move

2 Your Health New technology keeps runners on the move

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There are few people who can boast running thousands of miles but Deanna Smith can.
30 half marathons and 25 full marathons and dozens of running injuries.
 She hopes that new technology will end her running problems and keep her on the road
for many more years.

In just 48 hours, Smith  will join the chorus of pounding feet during the cooper river bridge run.

"Running with 13 kids and we've been training for the run so i have to be ready," Smith said.

 The 6.2 miles is a hop and a skip for this athlete who is accustomed to a greater distance

"I run longer distance half and full marathons so with this i just have to make sure i get a long run 3 or 4 times a week," Smith said.

But being a road runner has taken a toll on her body.

"I've dealt with numerous injuries torn hamstrings torn labrum shin splints plantar faciitis a couple of weeks ago," Smith said.

   Dr. Bright McConnell is letting the Tekscan system here at Charleston Sports Medicine and Orthopaedic Center
do the work.
Thin flexible sensors  will show Deanna exactly what happens in her body when her foot comes down on a surface.
Dr. McConnell says Tekscan measure everything about Deanna's foot strike, from where pressure is and where it is not.

"Right off the bat what some of the things that kind of pop out more pressure right heel mid foot more pressure hardly any pressure
here," Dr McConnell said.

The solution for Deanna is a customized orthotic that will be worn inside of her running shoe.
   It won't get Deanna to the finish line any faster but Dr. McConnell says Tekscan can tell a runner or walker what they need to know so that it is more likely they will  stay in step and injury free.

 
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