Pickens Co. Family Promoting Snake Safety This Summer - WCBD-TV: News, Weather, and Sports for Charleston, SC

Pickens Co. Family Promoting Snake Safety This Summer

Posted: Updated:
PICKENS COUNTY, S.C. -

When it comes to snakes and other creepy crawlers the Currens in Pickens County are the experts. 7 On Your Side's Shelby Coates asked them what you need to know to stay safe this summer when it come to snakes. They say the best advice is simple.

"Just leave it be," said Pierce Curren of Pierce's Scaly Adventures. "It doesn't want to be around you. Once it picks up your scent it's going to move."

The Currens tell us venomous snakes in our area include rattlesnakes, copperheads and water moccasins south of Columbia. The Currens say many times snakes don't attack or chase you, but if bitten here's what you need to know.

"If you do the X and you try to suck it out, you now just made a bigger mess," said Tanya Curren. "Now you have a cut, maybe stitches you have to deal with."

"The first thing is don't panic, because if you panic it speeds up the venom reaction," said Richard Curren. "Second thing is reach down, if you have a forethought, and grab your cell phone and take a picture of it."

Curren says that photo can save your life and your money. He says many times hospitals can use that photo to find out what bit you and the method of treatment to use. They also say if bitten keep pressure on the wound and get someone to drive you to the hospital.

"When the venom starts to take effect, depending on the species, it can start to impair your vision, or your breathing or slow down parts of your body," said Pierce.

The Currens say no matter the type of snake, if you see it, your best bet is to not touch it. And only handle snakes in the company of an expert.

For more information on identifying snakes and other safety tips visit Pierce's Scaly Adventure.

Shelby Coates
Shelby anchors and produces the weekend morning newscasts and is a general assignment reporter.
  • Most Viewed Stories on WSPA.com

  • Cuts period from suggested three to one year

    Moratorium goes through but planning commission shortens time span

    Moratorium goes through but planning commission shortens time span

    Wednesday, August 20 2014 11:14 PM EDT2014-08-21 03:14:55 GMT
    Just like the crowds on King Street that is sparking a call for a moratorium on new bars selling alcohol, a huge crowd of people filled the city's planning commissioners meeting on Wednesday.The planning commission took on two issues that garnered all the interest: a zoning ordinance that creates a new entertainment district overlay zone anda 36-moratorium on late night bars.Commission membersvoted5 to 4 voteto recommend a moratorium on new businesses selling alcohol for 12 months instead of ...
    Just like the crowds on King Street that is sparking a call for a moratorium on new bars selling alcohol, a huge crowd of people filled the city's planning commissioners meeting on Wednesday.The planning commission took on two issues that garnered all the interest: a zoning ordinance that creates a new entertainment district overlay zone anda 36-moratorium on late night bars.Commission membersvoted5 to 4 voteto recommend a moratorium on new businesses selling alcohol for 12 months instead of ...
  • Goose Creek school bus catches on fire

    Goose Creek school bus catches on fire

    Wednesday, August 20 2014 8:15 PM EDT2014-08-21 00:15:37 GMT
    A school bus in Goose Creek caught fire Wednesday afternoon. The bus driver was able to get all of the children off the bus without any injuries.The Goose Creek Rural Fire Department responded to Apple Circle in the Willowbrook Subdivision, and put out the fire by 6 p.m. The fire department says they haven't determined the cause of the fire at this time.
    A school bus in Goose Creek caught fire Wednesday afternoon. The bus driver was able to get all of the children off the bus without any injuries.The Goose Creek Rural Fire Department responded to Apple Circle in the Willowbrook Subdivision, and put out the fire by 6 p.m. The fire department says they haven't determined the cause of the fire at this time.
  • Researchers bury underwear to demonstrate soil health

    Researchers bury underwear to demonstrate soil health

    Wednesday, August 20 2014 7:00 PM EDT2014-08-20 23:00:24 GMT
    DIRTY DRAWERS: Underwear on the left shows good soil healthDIRTY DRAWERS: Underwear on the left shows good soil health
    Men's cotton briefs can serve the needs of science when buried in a field for a few weeks. It's a takeoff on an agronomy soil test that uses cotton swatches to measure carbon consumption by microbes. Microbes living in soil with plenty of carbon, rich in organic matter to turn into energy, don't have to eat the cotton. Bacteria in carbon-poor soil will eat what they can scavenge. The “soiled underwear test” helped Clemson and North Carolina State University Extension specialists teaching a p...
    Men's cotton briefs can serve the needs of science when buried in a field for a few weeks. It's a takeoff on an agronomy soil test that uses cotton swatches to measure carbon consumption by microbes. Microbes living in soil with plenty of carbon, rich in organic matter to turn into energy, don't have to eat the cotton. Bacteria in carbon-poor soil will eat what they can scavenge. The “soiled underwear test” helped Clemson and North Carolina State University Extension specialists teaching a p...
Powered by WorldNow

210 W. Coleman Blvd.
Mt. Pleasant, SC 29464

Telephone: 843.216.4875
Fax: 843.881.3410
Email: news@wcbd.com

Can't find something?
Powered by WorldNow
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Media General Communications Holdings, LLC. A Media General Company.