Berries made better: Macerating strawberries - WCBD-TV: News, Weather, and Sports for Charleston, SC

Berries made better: Macerating strawberries

Updated:
© Ingalls Photography / Bonnier © Ingalls Photography / Bonnier
  • Past stories from SaveurMore>>

  • Juicy Fruit: Mexico's prickly pear cactus fruits

    Juicy Fruit: Mexico's prickly pear cactus fruits

    In late summer in Mexico, prickly pear cactus fruits, or tunas, are everywhere—a refreshing snack eaten out of hand and a popular ingredient in candies, drinks, jams, and more.
    In late summer in Mexico, prickly pear cactus fruits, or tunas, are everywhere—a refreshing snack eaten out of hand and a popular ingredient in candies, drinks, jams, and more.
  • Bad weather? Make a stovetop smoker

    Bad weather? Make a stovetop smoker

    The rich flavors of smoked meat are closer than you think: all you need is a pot, foil, and a steamer insert to make a stovetop smoker.
    The rich flavors of smoked meat are closer than you think: all you need is a pot, foil, and a steamer insert to make a stovetop smoker.
  • Five essential tips for designing your kitchen

    Five essential tips for designing your kitchen

    Here are some less traditional ways to think about kitchen design, whether your project is outfitting a rental kitchen in a tiny walk-up, or the kind of larger-scale remodel you dream about.
    Here are some less traditional ways to think about kitchen design, whether your project is outfitting a rental kitchen in a tiny walk-up, or the kind of larger-scale remodel you dream about.

By



The process called maceration softens fruit and imparts flavor, transforming even less-than-perfect berries and stone fruit into something worthy of dessert.


Though macerating typically involves soaking fruit in an acidic liquid such as liqueur, lemon juice, or vinegar, the liquid is not always necessary, particularly in the case of water-dense strawberries. At 92 percent water by weight, strawberries need nothing more than a generous sprinkle of sugar to macerate.


Sugar, which draws out the liquid from strawberries, forms a tight bond with the extracted water molecules. The result is a bowl of tender fruit swimming in a sweet syrup, the perfect accompaniment to a scoop of ice cream or a slice of cake, like the almond cheesecake in our Swedish Midsummer story.


The sugar also enhances the strength of the strawberries' natural pectin, resulting in a near jamlike consistency. In fact, this is how the process of jam making begins.


Of course, the macerated fruit is also delicious on its own. The longer the strawberries macerate, the richer and more intense their flavor becomes.


The addition of herbs, zest, and other flavorings can enhance the mixture's aromas. In the case of the cheesecake, mint adds a refreshing herbal note. Other welcome additions include citrus zest, crushed green cardamom, star anise, and vanilla bean.



See the recipe for Ostkaka med Färska Jordgubbar och Mynta (Almond Cheesecake with Macerated Strawberries and Mint) »





© 2014 SAVEUR
All rights reserved.
*DISCLAIMER*: The information contained in or provided through this site section is intended for general consumer understanding and education only and is not intended to be and is not a substitute for professional advice. Use of this site section and any information contained on or provided through this site section is at your own risk and any information contained on or provided through this site section is provided on an "as is" basis without any representations or warranties.
Powered by WorldNow

210 W. Coleman Blvd.
Mt. Pleasant, SC 29464

Telephone: 843.216.4875
Fax: 843.881.3410
Email: news@wcbd.com

Can't find something?
Powered by WorldNow
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Media General Communications Holdings, LLC. A Media General Company.