How to eat a whole pumpkin

Fall Fun Guide

This Oct. 21, 2013 photo shows Thai pumpkin custard in Concord, N.H. Halloween may be done, but pumpkin season rolls on. Canned or fresh, it’s full of carotenoids and fiber, and it boasts more potassium than a banana. And a cup of canned pumpkin has just 80 calories. (AP Photo/Matthew Mead)

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD) – This spooky season, get the most out of your pumpkins. Whether you’re carving jack-o-lanterns or simply displaying the gourds on your porch, pumpkins are a delicious and healthy ingredient in countless dishes.

Pumpkin seeds are the easiest dish. After removing them from the flesh and rinsing them, they can be spread on a baking sheet and tossed in the oven at 350 degrees for 12 to 15 minutes. For more of a punch, add spices like salt, garlic powder, or cayenne pepper. For a sweeter flavor, add cinnamon and sugar.

The flesh can be pureed and used to make fall favorite baked goods like pies, muffins, breads, and cookies. It can also be used in savory dishes like bisques.

Pumpkin skin can be dehydrated, seasoned, and enjoyed just like chips. Minus the seasoning, it also makes a delicious treat for dogs.

If the pumpkin has been sitting on your porch for a while, you may not want to eat the flesh and skin, but it can still be part of a festive meal as a pumpkin keg.

To make a pumpkin keg, you’ll need a long-spouted container that fits inside of the pumpkin. Place the container inside the pumpkin and cut a hole for the spout to come out. Then, pour your beverage of choice inside the container and enjoy.

FALL FUN GUIDE: A list of fall events happening across the Lowcountry (click here)

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