Local activists buy sanitization supplies for Joseph Floyd Manor residents through care package project

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CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD) – With the City of Charleston’s ordinance requiring people to wear a mask going into effect on Wednesday, July 1, a group of young activists want to give back to the community.

The Charleston Activist Network partnered with some local women to start the Joseph Floyd Manor Care Package Project.

The project gives people the opportunity to donate money that will go towards buying items like paper towels, face masks, hand sanitizer and more that can help keep the resident of Joseph Floyd Manor safe.

Courtney Hicks, one of the project’s organizers, says that the history of the poor condition of the apartment complex is what led to her and her partners deciding to give back to the Joseph Floyd community.

She added that providing these items is huge because there’s a history of people of color not being treated fairly by law enforcement during times where they don’t have something that they aren’t able to afford.

“Although they have said that there will not be any fines or incrimination for those not having [supplies], at a high disproportion of rates, black and brown people have been criminalized and policed for not having what is in the regulations, so we want to make sure that we were going through all of the precautionary measures to make sure our seniors had the supplies need to stay safe and also stay out of harms way of any sort,” said Courtney Hicks on how important it is to provide sanitization supplies during this ahead of the ordinance.

At the beginning of the project, the goal was to reach $2,000, but, as of right now, the project has gained over $15,000 and counting.

Courtney now says, thanks to making more than they originally planned, the group will look into doing even more in the community.

 “We are going to try to find ways to redistribute those funds within Joseph Floyd Manor and also a lot of black and brown communities in downtown Charleston who may be underserved or feel as if they’re ignored, not only, in the middle of a pandemic but at a time where their lives are sometimes on the line through our cultural climate.”

Courtney Hicks

Courtney hopes that their project can help motivate others to create change in the community.

“…we hold the power and when we unify together, we create that community, when we give radically, it’s a way we can directly make change to those who are needing it the most.”

Courtney Hicks

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