Boeing works to maintain veteran workforce at North Charleston campus

Local News

NORTH CHARLESTON, SC (WCBD) – In 2009, Boeing selected a North Charleston site for a new 787 Dreamliner assembly line.

That decision brought thousands of jobs to the Lowcountry and sparked a new wave of large companies eyeing the area as hubs for their business.

Boeing talents scouts say they are committed to making sure veterans make up a good portion of their workforce.

A 1.2 million-square foot facility is home to nearly 6,500 team members. Nearly 20-percent of them veterans. 

“Their leadership, their integrity, their critical skills that they cultivated through their military service adds value to any team that they may be on at Boeing, but it also adds to the overall military culture.”

A military culture veteran program lead Lynn French says they work to support by seeking out men and women of the armed forces.

“It starts with a dedicated military recruiting team, we reach out to the veterans when they are transitioning, help them with resume reviews, interviewing tips,” he said. “We also have skills translating took which helps veterans identify Boeing occupations based on the military skills they have.”

An air force veteran himself, French says their commitment to the veteran workforce doesn’t end once they decide to join the team.

“Once we do hire them, as part of the on-boarding process, our veteran transition network allows them to partner with a current Boeing employee who is also a veteran to hopefully help them, assist and navigate the difficulties we sometimes have in the civilian sector.”

An investment they say is worth it given what veterans add to the team at Boeing. 

“Them being able to share their experiences and decision making, can only help Boeing in solving all the complex problems that we run into daily.”

Boeing also supports several non-profit organizations meant to empower veterans including Palmetto Warrior Connection and the Warrior Surf Foundation.

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