Lee now in favor of changing Confederate proclamation

Nation & World News

FILE – In this Aug. 18, 2017, file photo, a statue of Confederate Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest sits in a park in Memphis, Tenn. Republican Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee is facing backlash for signing a proclamation ordering a day to honor Forrest, an early leader of the Ku Klux Klan. Lee told reporters this week that a 1969 state law required him to sign the proclamation but declined to say whether he believed the law should be repealed. The proclamation designates July 13 as “Nathan Bedford Forrest Day.” Forrest was a Confederate cavalry general who had amassed a fortune as a plantation owner and slave trader in Memphis before the Civil War. (AP Photo/Adrian Sainz, File)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee now says he’s in favor of changing a law that requires the state to honor Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest, an early leader of the Ku Klux Klan.

Lee tweeted on Monday that while it’s his job to enforce the law, he plans on working to change a decades-old statute requiring governors to sign a proclamation designating July 13 as “Nathan Bedford Forrest Day.”

Lee’s statement Monday comes days after he faced national backlash for not only signing the proclamation last week, but also declining to answer if he thought the law should change. High-profile Republicans and Democrats criticized the signing.

Forrest was a Confederate cavalry general who had amassed a fortune as a plantation owner and slave trader in Memphis before the Civil War.

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